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Theogony

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8 thoughts on “ Theogony

  1. Disho
    West Theogony commentary p. translates ‘provinces’ or ‘spheres of influence’, citing some very interesting illustrations of this sense. 5. Compare the context of neikos at Works and Days 6. See note 4. 7. Folk etymology from kuklos ‘circle’ and ops ‘eye’. 8.
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  2. Vomi
    The Theogony details the genealogy of ancient Greek gods, from the beginning of the universe through the Olympian gods and various monsters and heroes descended from them.
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  3. Akitaur
    Welcome to the LitCharts study guide on Hesiod's Theogony. Created by the original team behind SparkNotes, LitCharts are the world's best literature guides. Hesiod is one of the oldest known Greek poets, writing in the eighth and seventh century B.C., roughly contemporaneous with Homer. Very little.
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  4. Fenrikus
    Follow/Fav Theogony. By: Darth Marrs "I was born almost three thousand years ago in the city of Sparta, born of a mortal woman and Zeus the Aegis Holder, the King of Olympus. I am a god. Your mother was born over three thousand years ago to Njord of the Vanir, and Nerthus, the River Goddess of the Northlands, and she was a goddess.
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  5. Malalrajas
    Nov 25,  · Theogony does not have the literary value of the Iliad or the Odyssey, because Hesiod was not a poet as great as Homer. In some parts, the book is .
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  6. Feshicage
    Jul 26,  · The Theogony and Works and Days contain the Greek understandings of divinity and human history at about the time they first learned to write. Unsurprisingly, the stories appear strange and even bizarre to the modern disttechrasenceidiccopirawilittti.co by:
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  7. Kasho
    The Theogony is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins of the Gods of Greece composed around BC. Contents[show] Description The Theogony is a large synthesis of the wider local Greek traditions concerning the Gods origins, organized as a narrative. It if often used as a sourcebook for Greek Mythology, however in formal terms it is a hymn invoking Zeus and the Muses. Story Note:This is a.
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